Automatically selected top science news story of the day ( ? )
Follow us with Twitter - Facebook - RSS feed - Bookmark
Next update in ¼ hour

Tech twist lets soldiers identify sniper positions in half a second

Cosmos Magazine - Sun 19 May 19

Radical revamp of WW1 research uses mobile phone to detect shooter distance and direction. Richard A Lovett reports.

Quieter intensive care units may translate to better outcomes for infants in new study

Medical Xpress - Mon 13 May 19

Excessive noise is widely known to have negative effects on health, and children in neonatal intensive care units are among the most vulnerable. To help preterm infants make a smooth transition ...

Quieter intensive care units may translate to better outcomes for infants in new study, Eurekalert - Mon 13 May 19

Locating a shooter from the first shot via cellphone

Phys.org - Mon 13 May 19

In the past several decades, militaries have worked hard to develop technologies that simultaneously protect infantry soldiers' hearing and aid in battlefield communication. However, these advanced ...

Locating a shooter from the first shot via cellphone, Eurekalert - Mon 13 May 19

How acoustics detected artillery in WWI

Phys.org - Mon 13 May 19

During World War I, William Lawrence Bragg led a team of engineers in the development of an acoustic method to locate enemy artillery, work that was so successful that it was soon used widely ...

How acoustics detected artillery in WWI, Science Blog - Mon 13 May 19
How acoustics detected artillery in WWI, Eurekalert - Mon 13 May 19

How acoustic 'sound ranging' was used to detect artillery movements during World War One 

Daily Mail - Mon 13 May 19

British physicist and Nobel prize winner aged just 25, Sir William Lawrence Bragg, was recruited to work on the project which allowed the British and US troops to detect the German artillery.

Noise-cancelling headsets worn by soldiers can reveal the position of a sniper after a single shot 

Daily Mail - Mon 13 May 19

French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis technology uses the sounds caused as bullets zip past to pinpoint attackers and could be used on the battlefield within two years.